The Interwovenness between Two Cultures

There has been so much richness with this season, let alone the people that shared their stories with me. One thing that I gained from hearing Hau'oli was learning how he was able to find himself falling in love with both of his ethnic identity as a Filipino and Hawaiian. The food that he describes himself with as I asked every people in the podcast said, Kūlolo Lumpia. For anyone who might not know what Kulolo is, it is a Kūlolo is a Hawaiian dessert made primarily with baked or steamed grated taro corms and either with grated coconut meat or coconut milk and Lumpia as you already know it is a type of spring rolls that are made in thin paper -like or crepe-like pastry skin called "lumpia wrapper" enveloping savory or sweet fillings rolls in which you can fill it with Kūlolo.



POST INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:


1.WHAT DID YOU LEARN ABOUT YOURSELF DURING THE INTERVIEW

Community is important. So I must continue to create those community connections between being Hawaiian/Filipino. I think it would be awesome to have a group of people write an anthology about what it means to be Hawaiian and Filipino.


2. HOW CAN WE BE PROACTIVE IN SHARING OUR CULTURE?

Learn what we can from those who are older, then share all that we know with those that are younger.


3. ONE TIP YOU WANT TO LEAVE THE LISTENERS:

Take the time to listen, record, and share stories.


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When it comes to being a Filipino in Hawai'i, there is this need of learning not only where you come from as your individual culture as a Filipino but also the importance of learning the history of the place which whom you are settling in. There are so much history interwoven within each other and ways that we can help each other grow and thrive as a community. We both share common values with family being our top priority. As you start to listen to Hau'oli's story and narrative, keep this in mind:


ʻOiai e nānā mai ana nō nā maka
While the eyes still look around.
[While a person is living, treat him kindly and learn what you can from him.]
ʻOi kaʻakaʻa ka maka,
while the eyes are open [and there is still life].


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